Japan Week Comes to Grand Central

By Alex Cullina, Staff Writer   The Japanese National Tourism Organization put on its seventh annual Japan Week from March 14 to 17 at Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall. Free and open to the public, Japan Week showcased Japanese culture, food, art and travel.   The expo was made up of booths put on by…

New Netflix Docuseries Details a “Wild, Wild” Series of Events

By Leanne MacPherson, Contributing Writer “Wild, Wild Country” is blazing a new trail for old obsessions on Netflix. Today’s society seems to have an obsession with cults and controversial religious movements. From the Manson Family to the People’s Temple and subsequent Jonestown massacre, twentieth century cults have been the topic of countless movies, books, documentaries…

NYU Steinhardt Comes ‘Of a Certain Age’

By Jessica Xing, Contributing Writer   “Of a Certain Age,” a production created by NYU Steinhardt’s Program in Educational Theater, works to question the invisibility of old age — it is an examination of how performing artists, who thrive on being visible, deal with their slow but gradual erasure from a craft to which they’ve…

“The Strangers: Prey at Night”

By Guru Ramanathan, Staff Writer   Johannes Roberts’ unnecessary horror sequel “The Strangers: Prey at Night” features Kim Wilde’s “Kids in America,” visuals straight out of a John Carpenter horror movie, and inexplicable plotting all within the opening five minutes. The film quickly establishes the type of horror flick the audience has to sit through…

“Mute” A Spiritual Sequel to “Moon”

By Guru Ramanathan, Staff Writer   Duncan Jones’ “Moon” is an underrated sci-fi film that became a cult classic due to the astounding performance from Sam Rockwell, stunning visual effects on a small budget, and a haunting score from Clint Mansell. Almost ten years later, Jones has co-written and directed “Mute,” a spiritual sequel to…

The Public Theatre Gets Political with “The Low Road”

By Emma Hernando, Staff Writer With the stress brought on by America’s current political climate, we are inundated by every source of entertainment media addressing politics- from social media to the Oscars. Sometimes it seems the only place we truly can escape are through theatre and film, but because these times are so pivotal, theatre…

OSHUN Flies Through Space

By Sabeena N Singhani, Staff Writer OSHUN, comprised of Thandiwe and Niambi Sala, two NYU alumni that met at MLK scholar orientation, made an appearance at Treble Tuesdays, a weekly event for creatives in and out of the music industry sponsored by the Treble app. Thandiwe studied Journalism and Africana Studies in CAS, while Niambi…

The Ephemeral Life in ‘Leaning Into the Wind’

By Joel Lee, Staff Writer “Leaning Into the Wind — Andy Goldsworthy,” directed by Thomas Riedelsheimer, gracefully follows British sculptor Goldsworthy through his various installations and sculptures of nature. Interviews with Goldsworthy and his art supplement the documentary’s philosophical and spiritual undertones. The film itself is a mesmerizing masterpiece of cinematography that captures the artist’s…

In Real Life: Review

By Carter Glace, Staff Writer For a second week of breaking down female comic works, we look at a comic that takes well trodden ground and takes it in a fresh, fascinating, and thoughtful direction. “In Real Life,” co-written and drawn by Jen Wang, came out in 2014, and centers around Anda, a young computer…

Hump Day Update 3/21/18

By Rachel A.G. Gilman, Staff Writer Welcome back to Hump Day Update, the place to find out everything you need to know about what’s been going on in the entertainment world for the week. I’m Rachel A.G. Gilman. But enough about me, let’s get to the news.   “American Idol” is back and telling people around…

Nimona

By Carter Glace, Staff Writer So, how about those Oscars? It almost felt fitting that the 90th Academy Awards was the first to occurring in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp. The industry is facing a major paradigm shift, a complete upending of the social hierarchy and world views that dominated the industry for almost…

Art, and Her Required Absence from Architect’s Blueprints

A toxic love story between art and gentrification. By Emily Conklin, Staff Writer Gentrification and ineffective public art are two of the most glaring problems affecting New York City’s neighborhoods today — Williamsburg has higher rents than many fashionable Manhattan addresses, and Times Square continues to throw gaudy plastic hearts in the viewfinders of Instagrams…