‘A Woman, A Part’ Is a Promising First Feature

By Sophie Bennett, Staff Writer Beginning in the mid-1990s, Elisabeth Subrin has made films ranging from experimental to shorts and now a feature-length film. Her work consists of tackling feminism and woman in society. Now she has transitioned into feature length film starring Maggie Siff, Cara Seymour, and John Ortiz. The film “A Woman, A…

New York Feminist Film Week Showcases Films that Need to be Seen

By Sophie Bennett, Staff Writer Anthology Film Archives is an organization that focuses on certain stories or filmmakers and the incredible work surrounding them. For a week Anthology is doing a series examining feminist filmmaking, specifically filmmaking about experiences of cis women of color as well as the LGBTQ women community. Films ranged from discussions…

“Table 19” Works on Paper But Fails in Execution

By Carter Glace, Staff Writer “Table 19” is that confounding kind of movie where it clearly as all of the pieces to be interesting and engaging film, it has a winning cast, and the things that happen on screen are theoretically good. And yet the film just doesn’t quite work. Anna Kendrick plays a former…

In Film ‘Tickling Giants,’ Politics Is a Laughing Matter

By Anubhuti Kumar, Staff Writer “Tickling Giants” is the perfect title for the new documentary about the rise of a comedian who got his laughs by poking fun at prickly figures who do not take kindly to a questioning of their authority. While the name Jon Stewart is ubiquitous in the United States, the story…

A Living and Breathing ‘Taipei Story’

By Tristen Calderon, Staff Writer Edward Yang’s 1985 feature “Taipei Story” presents the city of Taipei from a very relatable, human perspective that is definitively middle-class. Restored in stunning 4K resolution for its first US theatrical run at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, “Taipei Story” takes a wide-scope look in to the subtle nuances of…

“The Last Word” Fails to Meet its Ambitions

By Sophie Bennett, Staff Writer Upon the Lunar New Year comes the feel-good film, “The Last Word,” directed by Mark Pellington. The film brings together veteran actresses Shirley Maclaine, Amanda Seyfried and newcomer AnnJewel Lee Dixon. Set in the town of Bristol, Harriet Lauler (MacLaine) is an elderly woman who has alienated her friends and…

Oscars Looked Up — For the Most Part

By Sophie Bennett, Staff Writer In Hollywood, the Academy Awards are the most prestigious achievement that someone working in the film industry can get. The highly sought-after award gains recognition for artists to have much broader career opportunities, not to mention the added respect among peers and outsiders alike. Unlike the Golden Globes, the Oscars…

“Paraguay” Provides a Colorful Remembering

By Tristen Calderon, Contributing Writer Dominque Dubosc’s “Paraguay Remembered” is, plain and simply, beautiful. The film opens mysteriously and enticingly with shots floating down a river past different flora and fauna. Dubosc’s French narration is heard and the viewer is immediately pulled into the bright and clear quality of his intonation and his precision with…

“My Life as a Zucchini” Elevates the Power of Animation

By Matthew Holman, Contributing Writer “My Life as a Zucchini” is as strange as the title might propose.  The French-Swiss animated film’s animator Claude Barras is currently nominated for an Academy Award — and this is just his debut for feature-length projects.   The film follows its titular character’s journey adapting to life in an…

Anthology Highlights Leonard Cohen’s Greatest Score

By Daniella Nichinson, Staff Writer 2016 took the life of one of the few talented artists left from a revolutionary generation, a poet as much as a musician — Leonard Cohen. His lyrics captured the core of humanity, haunting listeners with their gravity and moving melodies. To honor Cohen’s immeasurable brilliance, Anthology Film Archives will…

“My Name is Emily” is Beautiful, Painful and Comforting

By Anubhuti Kumar, Staff Writer Green meadows, luscious trees, quaint towns, empty roads and peace as far as the eye can see. “My Name is Emily” takes audiences on a trip across the idyllic Irish countryside, which stands in sharp contrast with the pain and angst of the main characters fragmented family lives. Evanna Lynch…

Eagles of Death Metal Revisit the Paris Attacks

By Kinder Labatt, Contributing Writer Directing a film that reflects a dreadful terrorist attack in an equally hopeful and refreshing manner has been proven to be a difficult task, yet Colin Hanks has done just that. Still new to the director’s chair, Hank’s sophomore documentary, “Eagles of Death Metal: Nos Amis (Our Friends),” recounts the…