Anthology Highlights Leonard Cohen’s Greatest Score

By Daniella Nichinson, Staff Writer 2016 took the life of one of the few talented artists left from a revolutionary generation, a poet as much as a musician — Leonard Cohen. His lyrics captured the core of humanity, haunting listeners with their gravity and moving melodies. To honor Cohen’s immeasurable brilliance, Anthology Film Archives will…

“My Name is Emily” is Beautiful, Painful and Comforting

By Anubhuti Kumar, Staff Writer Green meadows, luscious trees, quaint towns, empty roads and peace as far as the eye can see. “My Name is Emily” takes audiences on a trip across the idyllic Irish countryside, which stands in sharp contrast with the pain and angst of the main characters fragmented family lives. Evanna Lynch…

Eagles of Death Metal Revisit the Paris Attacks

By Kinder Labatt, Contributing Writer Directing a film that reflects a dreadful terrorist attack in an equally hopeful and refreshing manner has been proven to be a difficult task, yet Colin Hanks has done just that. Still new to the director’s chair, Hank’s sophomore documentary, “Eagles of Death Metal: Nos Amis,” recounts the horrifying acts…

‘Akron’ is an Impotent Love Story

By Tristen Calderon, Staff Writer Sasha King and Brian O’Donnell’s new film “Akron” tells the sweet and simple story of two boys who fall in love in college. With honest representations of homosexuality in mainstream media still lacking, a story like this one should carry some impact. However, the uninspired attempt at writing drama and…

“Land of Mine” Is A Thought-Provoking Post-WW2 Drama

By Ali Hassan, Contributing Writer Danish Director Martin Zandvliet’s new film “Land of Mine” follows the tale of a group of German prisoners of war (POWs) who are forced to defuse landmines, making for a complex and heartrending film. It successfully portrays the Nazi POWs not as evil men being made to pay for their…

“American Fable” is One Silo Short of a Success

By Sidney Williams, Contributing Writer In her directorial debut, Anne Hamilton’s “American Fable” is an intriguing attempt by a young director to incorporate mysticism and thriller-like scenes into the simple backstory of a family’s financial struggles. Influenced by the likes of Terrence Malick and Guillermo del Toro, Hamilton delivers picturesque shots of farmland and eerie…

Abramovic Draws Art from Mysticism

By Zuzia Czemier-Wolonciej, Staff Writer Marina Abramovic, the 70-year-old Yugoslavian performance artist, is undeniably one of the most important visionaries of our time. She has been furthering the boundaries of physical and emotional endurance through her work for over four decades. However, even the most extraordinary artist can certainly be doubted when she recalls in…

“On The Map” Tells A Remarkable Sports Tale

By Sophie Bennett, Staff Writer In the year 1977 the Israeli basketball team defied all odds and defeated many European teams to win the European Championship. Beginning with a brief overview of basketball and Israel’s history, “On The Map” dives into the roots of the Maccabi Tel Aviv team. In 1973 Israel was longing for an…

“Slash” Gives a Good–Not Great–Account of Life on the Internet

By Carter Glace, Staff Writer “Slash” is the rare modern film that actually has something interesting to talk about regarding the Internet Age. As a millennial helplessly glued to his phone, I find most attempts to comment on our new tech-heavy society to have nothing interesting to bring to the discussion, always going for the…

Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals” Stays True To Its Name

By Dakshayani Shankar, Contributing Writer Tom Ford’s new film “Nocturnal Animals” touches on the darker aspects of the human emotion, predominantly heartbreak, grief and pain in a stylistic way that leaves audiences captivated by the character contrasts but also reeling for more. The film is structured around three different storylines that Ford manages to weave…

‘Red Turtle’ is a Winner

By Tye Musante, Staff Writer The minute the newest Studio Ghibli film “The Red Turtle” begins, it is immediately noticeable how striking and rich the sound production is in the film. Lush soundscapes include crashing waves, chirping birds and wild storms take the place of dialogue. The opening finds viewers following an unfortunate traveler who…

‘Illinois Parables’ is Beautiful, Telling and Needed

By Zuzia Czemier-Wolonciej, Staff Writer Deborah Stratman’s “Illinois Parables” is a story told in celluloid verse — a cinematic poem. Placing this film within a genre will yield no helpful result, for it gathers strength from its free-from and lack of pretense to present any one objective. Instead, the film enthralls its audience with a…